kjv-kids-study-bibleI imagine that many of the veterans of children’s ministry experience incredible nostalgia when interacting with the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. I memorized hundreds of Bible verses in the KJV. And regardless of where one stands on the issue of translation, the KJV has an incredible tradition and history surrounding it.

It only makes historical sense to take the KJV and make a kids study Bible around it.

And that’s exactly what the King James Version Holy Bible Kids Study Bible is. The “timeless classic” KJV translation coupled with great features and study aids for children makes for a great kids study Bible.

The features in this kids study Bible are very similar to those found in the NIV Adventure Bible (it is in the same publishing family).

  • An overview of each book of the Bible that details the author, why the book was written, what is learned about God, who are the key people, when the book was written, and where it happened.
  • “Did You Know” informational sections that help the reader understand the meaning of words as well as some context as to what is going on.
  • “Words to Remember” highlights a Bible verse worth memorizing.
  • “Let’s Live It!” is an applicational tool that brings the ancient narrative into sharp, practical and relevant practice for the student in their life.
  • “Life in Bible Times” helps the reader understand in modern language what an ancient reader would have known already. It helps translate what was meant in an ancient context to a modern one.

There are also a number of color inserts to inform and educate the young reader in the context and content of an ancient manuscript.

If the KJV is your translation of choice, then your children and your church’s children will love this study Bible!

Specifics

Is the King James Version Holy Bible Kids Study Bible a full text of the Bible? Yes.
Does this story Bible have a lot of Bible stories in it? All of them.
Are the major Bible stories present? Yep.

Number of pages: 1600
Age range: 8 – 12 years
Publisher: ZonderKidz, June 5, 2001

This story Bible is available at:

Giveaway Details and Instructions

We are giving this Bible away! Here’s how:

Anyone and everyone is eligible. In order to be included in the random drawing you must do one of the 4 things below.

  1. Comment below this post on your preferred Bible translation.
  2. Comment on your preferred Bible translation or like the post @ Wesleyan Kids’ Facebook page
  3. Tweet this post or retweet @wesleyankids tweet.
  4. Subscribe to WesleyanKids.org email notifications on the right sidebar of this webpage, titled “Don’t Miss a Single Post.”

The contest is open for one week. At midnight on Tuesday, October 29, the contest will close, and the winner will be picked using a randomizer program and announced the following day.

7 COMMENTS

    • Mine, too. I’ve been studying out of it for 20 years. As new translations come out, I find myself not wanting to change because I’m so used to the NIV. Funny, that’s what I used to hear about the KJV :) And it was the standard translation for almost 300 years!!

  1. I personally prefer the NIV version of the Bible. However, when it comes to reciting the Lords Prayer, the 23rd Psalm and several other verses, I prefer the KJV version because that is how I memorized them growing up in the Presbyterian Church. Now, as I teach 6-8 year olds in the Wesleyan Church, I often use different versions of the Bible and present several versions of the same verse for the kids to see the difference in wording.

    Thank you for all the helpful information on the Wesleyan Kids website.

    Donna White

  2. I usually personally read from the NIV. With kids, I like to use the NIrV (New International Reader’s Version).

  3. I personally prefer the NIV version also. However, my son attends a Christian school and they teach and recite verses from the KJV. This would be great addition to our study materials.
    Thank you for doing all the product reviews, they are very helpful!

  4. I prefer the KJV of the Bible. When I was in grades 4-6, the church I attended had a memory work program. All of the scripture I memorized was from the KJV. It is difficult to teach Bible memory work in a group of children today because of the wide variety of translations. I like other translations for Bible study helps, but I prefer the KJV and with some effort, the “out-dated word-usage” can be understood in many instances, even by children.

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